Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Oldie du Jour : En Français dans le Texte

Long long before Gainsbourg covers became fashionable, there was, er, Jo Lemaire, I guess.
Who she is, where did she go, I have no idea.
But this is Belgian and it's pretty nice.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Oldie du Jour : Synths and Ninjas

What the hell is going on here!
Gee, music used to be so much fun.
This is effing groovy.
Can't say that I recognize the synth. If anybody has an idea...

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Oldie du Jour : Synths and Mustaches

Fun Electro/Prog/Pop from (I think, correct me if I'm wrong) Hungary.
Nice Polymoog, man.
And don't get me started on the mustaches.

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Dark Side of the Monotribe

Another quick Korg Monotribe demo.
This is meant to show how mean the analog filter is.


One single take, no external effects.

Dark Side of the Monotribe by khoral

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Monday, July 18, 2011

Monotribe, Of Course

Well, I just had to get one, right?


I'll do a review later on this week, but here's my first quick demo. All Monotribe multi-tracking, no external effects, sync'd by ear.


Monotribe Demo by khoral

Saturday, July 16, 2011

A Lesson in Death: Apocalypse Now and Blade Runner

Download pdf



A Lesson in Death: « Apocalypse Now » and « Blade Runner »
 
In « Apocalypse Now », following the narrative of the Conrad novel, « Heart of Darkness », Willard sails up the river in search for Kurtz, brilliant Colonel who’s become the omnipotent leader of a rogue army, pursuing a savage war according to his own rules. In « Blade Runner », Deckard hunts down four runaway replicants, genetically engineered in the image of man, and for that very reason, outlawed on Earth. Both films tell the story of a solitary, alcoholic anti-hero, haunted by a past the audience won’t know much about, put in charge by the authorities to chase and kill a charismatic and mysterious renegade, who acts outside the world of men, ruling as a living semi-god over a handful of souls. Willard will face Colonel Walter Kurtz, Deckard will face replicant Roy Batty. 


Life on the Outside: Willard and Deckard

Coppola’s movie begins with Willard, whom we discover in a Saïgon hotel room facing his demons, lying despondently on an unmade bed, his eyes lost towards the ceiling. Dancing visions of napalm before him, long trails of fire over a dark jungle. Willard is a loner. When a mission is finally given to him, he complains having to share the trip: « I needed the air and the time. Only problem was, I wouldn't be alone ». Deckard too is solitary man, in life and in work. Retired from the blade runner business, he first declines the mission, but is soon called back to the stark facts of life in future Los Angeles: « If you're not cop, you're little people ». Afterwards, this blade runner looks oddly remote from his social function, delivering morally neutral sentences such as: « Replicants are like any other machine. They're either a benefit or a hazard. If they're a benefit, it's not my problem ». Willard and Deckard first appear to be disconnected from society, then, as the movie goes on, disconnected from mankind. Like Willard facing his superiors, Deckard acts as an automaton. Only existing through his function in society, he superficially plays the game, with no personal involvement. To the replicant Rachel, he administers the Voight Kampff test that is supposed to discriminate man from its imitation. He speaks in a bored monotone, devoid of positive or negative emotion. The same way, Willard admits his inability to lead a normal civil life, but don’t seem to fit either with his fellow bandsmen. He’s no longer part of the living. He already belongs to the Heart of Darkness, Kurtz’s kingdom, that is the kingdom of Death.

The gap between Willard and the world isn’t merely of a social nature; it is existential. True, prisoner of his hotel room, Willard blames his disarray on the boredom of a soldier deprived of a mission. In a fit of self-destructive rage, he violently hits his reflection in the mirror, then contemplates with mute astonishment the blood dripping from his hand. This reminds us of the way the same Willard will later describe Kurtz: « He broke from them, and then he broke from himself », first indication that hero and villain are one and the same. Yet, Willard’s pain can’t be explained away by boredom. It is existential suffering. His act is an expression of despair, as pure and primitive than Batty’s wolf-like cry when Pris dies. Like Deckard, he only exist through his mission, which, like the vain eradication of « more human than human» replicants, is a chimera: « You understand, Captain, that this mission does not exist, nor will it ever exist ». Several times, Willard will point at the senselessness of his mission: in the middle of a surrealistic massacre, facing a thousand deaths, going up the river to kill a soldier accused of murder. His doubts echo Kurtz’s words at the beginning of the movie, fragments of monologues on damaged audio tape: « They call me an assassin. What do you call it, when the assassins accuse the assassin? » If Willard and Deckard, unlike Kurtz and Batty, do share a social function, this function is a veil of illusion, hiding an existential void. Without a mission to justify his presence to the world, staring into his reflection, Willard sees himself for what he really is: a nothingness, the Hollow Man from T.S. Eliot’s poem, as quoted by Kurtz at the end of the movie.

When the other characters express doubt about Willard and Deckard’s work, their alienation from the world is complete. Rachel asks Deckard if he ever «retired » a human being by mistake, if himself has ever passed the Voight Kampff test, if he actually would hunt her down if she were to run away. To Kurtz, Willard is neither killer nor soldier: « You're an errand boy, sent by grocery clerks, to collect a bill ». Kurtz’s derisive reference to Willard’s superiors as petty salesmen is reminiscent of the mercenary attitude found in Batty’s creator: « Commerce is our goal here at Tyrell ». However, Kurtz’s sarcasm is misplaced. Willard, at this point, is no longer a soldier, nor is he a puppet at the hands of his superiors. He is an abstraction, a Beckett character, a man who fell down the world of men, the same way Deckard, finding the unicorn’s origami on the floor, realizes that his last thread to mankind has been cut. Willard and Deckard are existential outcasts.

Willard and Deckard are metaphysical misfits: on the fringe of society, but more importantly on the fringe of being, trying to decipher an arcane universe. Willard’s look upon the other characters is one of disbelief, the look of a XIXth century explorer confronting the incomprehensible customs of an unknown tribe. He’s part of their world but can’t understand the motive of their actions. Deckard, on the other hand, has gone beyond Willard’s constant amazement and obviously gave up on figuring out how people like Bryant and Gaff, perfectly fit to their social environment, manage to function. The blade runner displays a disillusioned passivity that goes well beyond the usual Film Noir ironic distance. Neither Willard nor Deckard can communicate with their fellowmen. Both face a wall: the chaos of the world, and what parades as « order » inside the chaos. To the soldier, an apocalyptic war and the absurd care for military hierarchy in the confines of Hell. To the blade runner, the urban nightmare that is the futuristic Babel of Los Angeles, infinite maze of titan buildings and foreign cultures, and, at the centre of this Bosch-like mayhem, the caste system based on the arbitrary distinction between humans and replicants. 


Life on the Outside: Batty and Kurtz

Society has rendered the same verdict on both Batty and Kurtz: two deviant individuals, parodies of mankind that must be destroyed (regarding the replicants, « This was not called execution. It was called retirement »; regarding Kurtz, « Terminate with extreme prejudice »). Kurtz and Batty, self-ordained divinities, speak in riddles and look upon the mass with an absolute sense of superiority. At the same time, this superiority is the root cause of their downfall. The leader of the replicants is a nietszcheean figure, beyond mankind, doomed to fiercely burn and suddenly disappear. Batty must die because he is merely an imitation, a « skin job », a façade designed to perfectly imitate his creator. A slave, his freedom is the evil that Deckard must cleanse society of. Batty has been judged to be intrinsically foreign to mankind. Kurtz, on the other hand, must die because his actions have banned him from the world of men, because he has surrendered to the dark side of the soul, to a murderous madness that is tantamount to the primitive spirit of the jungle, according to the western General who briefs Willard : « Every man has got a breaking point. You have and I have one. Walter Kurtz has reached his. And, very obviously, he has gone insane. He's out there operating without any decent restraint, totally beyond the pale of any acceptable human conduct ». The General is right: every man has got a breaking point. To this protector of order and social rationality, beyond the breaking point lies insanity.

At first glance, Batty and Kurtz do seem deranged. Batty’s emotions are subject to violent changes, he drools and cries like a wolf, and maniacally chases Deckard. Kurtz in his kingdom at the Heart of Darkness has abandoned all common rationality and detached from himself. « And what would his people back home want, if they ever learned just how far from them he'd really gone. He broke from them, and then he broke from himself ». He wanders in a labyrinth of ancient stone, reading aloud T.S. Eliot and rambling on. His only western companions are an ex-Marine with a vacant look and a brain-damaged hippie journalist. That said, Batty’s seemingly insane behavior is but the result of an existential quest that the replicant follows with an intensity of purpose that is forever alien to the common man. Bryant and the General can’t handle such purity (« Because there's nothing I detest more than the stench of lies », Kurtz). Batty only obeys to his own logic and the oddities of his behavior stem from the very conditions of his creation: a warrior with fake memories, condemned by his creator to master a lifetime’s experiences in the span of four years. Kurtz talks at length about his breaking point. He tells Willard about how the Vietcong, after American troops provided vaccine to the children of a village, gave orders to cut off every single arm. He recalls the event with admiration and repulsion, stunned by this extraordinary display of will. At this point, Kurtz understood the superior strength of his enemy, the all-consuming drive to vanquish, unaltered by moral considerations. Then only did Kurtz become the ultimate product of the Vietnam War that Willard meets in the deep of the jungle, an individual who’s become over-adapted to his environment, a soldier who totally identified with his enemy to overcome him. There’s no turning back from this transformation (« To make an alteration in the evolvment of an organic life system is fatal », Tyrell). Kurtz, and Batty, to some extent, are sane individuals dealing with an insane society. Such people cannot be allowed to prosper.


Room of Mirrors: Deckard versus Batty, Willard versus Kurtz

Willard and Deckard are morally ambiguous, and so are their opponents. After he coolly ends the life of an unjustly wounded Vietnamese girl, Willard remarks that, from now on, his companions wouldn’t look at him the same way. Neither will the viewer. This is Willard’s first killing on screen, who until then was a passive spectator of the war. Remarkably enough, this act is directed upon a civilian. Like Kurtz, Willard isn’t just prone to violence, he is wholly possessed by the spirit of war, breathing through a combat that he knows is meaningless. War, to Willard, is a drug. The opening scene is a withdrawal scene. Only this way can we understand the attraction/repulsion that Willard feels towards the fight. In this again, Willard and Kurtz are one. The Colonel, a force of nature who surrendered to the soul of war, then to the soul of the jungle, must die, because Death only can liberate him from addiction. War as a drug is a pervasive metaphor: see the psychedelic atmosphere of the movie’s last part, the hallucinated motions of Lance as the ship goes deeper into the jungle, the hypnotic, oriental melody of the Doors… Deckard too is ambiguous, who hunts down and kills sentient creatures we can’t tell from human beings (Tyrell mockingly quotes the parameters of the Voight Kampff test: « Capillary dilation of the so-called blush response? Fluctuation of the pupil? Involuntary dilation of the iris », technical attributes that are supposed to distinguish man and machine). His relationship with Rachel is tinted with violence and domination. Is there a difference between Deckard’s and Batty’s executions? Deckard shoots down an unarmed Zhora in the back. A melancholy Batty confesses to his Creator, Tyrell: « I've done questionable things ». Indeed, his attitude towards violence is complex, as is Kurtz’s. Both individuals are warriors at heart – Batty, by design of his Creator, Kurtz, by vocation – but both painfully feel the proximity of death. Proof of this, the way Batty breaks the bad news about Leon’s demise, then his reaction when discovering the inert body of Pris, finally the tears shed while murdering Tyrell. Proof of this, the crack-up inside Kurtz, which reflects Willard’s inner torment, both soldiers doomed to live and relive “the horror”.

The superficial opposition between Deckard and Batty is the mirror image of Willard and Kurtz’s. Batty, as a lesson on human condition, turns Deckard into his double, a slave on the run: « Quite an experience to live in fear, isn't it? That's what it is to be a slave ». Replicants and soldiers learn to live in fear. Kurtz begs Willard to put an end to his existence and tell the world what he tried to accomplish. On the surface, Willard is a tool of society. In a more metaphysical sense, Kurtz drew his doppelgänger Willard closer and closer to him, like a magnet, like the backward surge of an infinite wave. Kurtz turned Willard into the means of his own deliverance. Willard indeed sees himself as the hand of fate: « Everybody wanted me to do it. Him most of all. I felt like he was up there, waiting for me to take his pain away. Even the jungle wanted him dead. And that's who he really who he took his orders from, anyway ». When he emerges from the Colonel’s lair, his machete covered in blood, stared at by the primitive cohorts, Willard is Kurtz. The replicant leader and the colonel have staged their death before a witness of their choosing: as soon as the « hero » meets his opponent, he’s fallen under his total control. All the time, Batty is able to kill Deckard. Kurtz strikingly worries about the way his story will be told back in America. Not a single second does he envision killing Willard and going back home. Kurtz burned all this bridges down. Beyond the breaking point, up the river, there is no return. The Colonel wrote his own dark legend and hopes Willard, his alter-ego, will bring his lesson back to the civilized world. Willard embarks the ship, Deckard runs away with Rachel, but it’s doubtful either one really escaped their opponent’s inner world. Willard and Deckard aren’t seen as enemies by their adversaries, but the witnesses to their rise and fall, to whom an existential lesson is delivered. Deckard is drawn to Batty, just like the river ineluctably leads Willard to Kurtz: « Weeks away and hundreds of miles up river that snaked through the war like a circuit cable...plugged straight into Kurtz ».


The Art of Death

The worlds depicted in « Blade Runner » and « Apocalypse Now » fall under the jurisdiction of Death. The latter, in the most obvious way: the Vietnam War is but the last avatar of a certain idea of warfare as the total annihilation of the Enemy (« We must incinerate them. Pig after pig. Cow after cow. Village after village. Army after army », Kurtz). Another subtler version of Death is at work in « Blade Runner »: a decadent Los Angeles, populated with artificial things, make-believe animals (the owl, the serpent) and androids that the viewer can’t discriminate from the dehumanized citizens of the future. J.F. Sebastian, plagued with degenerative disease, lives among his manufactured friends: « My friends are toys. I make them ». In this regard, both films are Gnostic allegories: characters imprisoned in an inferior world ruled by Death. Batty is a fallen angel, as he himself suggests: « Fiery the angels fell. Deep thunder rode around their shores, burning with the fires of Orc ». The dialog between Pris and Sebastian is explicitly Gnostic: « Pris: What's your problem? Sebastian: Methuselah syndrome. Pris: What's that? Sebastian: My glands. They grow old too fast. Pris: Is that why you're still on earth? ». Sebastian, like the replicants, like Deckard, has been sentenced to live on Earth, the inferior world, subject to entropy and decay. Life is elsewhere, in the heavens: « A new life awaits you in the Off-world colonies. The chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure ». Willard and Deckard are trapped in this mock reality: « When I was here, I wanted to be there.  When I was there... all I could think of was getting back into the jungle ». Similarly, Kurtz’s first words are a nostalgic evocation of the lost paradise: « I went down that river once when I was a kid. There's a place in the river, I can't remember...must have been a gardenia plantation, or a flower plantation at one time. It's all wild and overgrown now. But for about five miles, you'd think that heaven just fell on the earth, in the form of gardenias ». Willard sails up the river, traveling back in time towards the primordial horror that Kurtz is the center of. The Colonel’s memories sail down the river, from the abomination of the present to the fantasy realm of golden youth.

The Colonel and the replicant deliver their own eulogy. Here only do they somehow part company. Kurtz has fallen to pieces: « I'd never seen a man so broken up and ripped apart ». He who explored the depths of reality only wishes Death’s release: « The horror… the horror »… partly a reflection on war, for sure, but the line is directly drawn from the novel and most certainly deals with the primordial terror Kurtz experiences at the hands of his demons, in the deep of the jungle. Speculating is meaningless. Whatever Kurtz saw remains an enigma, just like Batty (« if only you could see what I've seen with your eyes »). What matters is that Kurtz has glimpsed into the Heart of Darkness. « Horror has a face. And you must make a friend of horror. Horror and moral terror are your friends.  If they are not, then they are enemies to be feared ». Kurtz is a man in ruins, torn apart by his obsessions, like Macbeth after the crime. Batty on the other hand, the fallen angel brought back to Earth to catch a supplement of life, believes that the brevity of his existence is a technical defect. Replicants only live four years. He meets his God, his Creator, the genius Tyrell (« He knows everything », says the Chinese engineer ; « It's not an easy thing to meet your maker », says Batty). Tyrell asks the prodigal son what seems to be the problem. Death is the problem. The Creator admits his own limitations in this matter: « Well, I'm afraid that's a little out of my jurisdiction ». Tyrell explains that Batty has been designed as well as he could be. The finite character of existence isn’t open to negotiation (« You don’t ask Death for its credentials », W.S. Burroughs). Gaff, later on, will remind Deckard that Rachel too must be retired: « It's too bad she won't live. But then again, who does? » Batty, by getting extra life, won’t become any more human. Knowing that his existence is finite is actually what defines him as Human. « The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long. And you have burned so very very brightly, Roy ». He is lucky in having a Creator to bring his grievances to. The almighty Tyrell, recluse in his golden tower on top of the city, is a tangible reality. Sole among the mass, Batty gets to receive an answer from his Creator. His mortality accepted, with a melancholy at odds with Kurtz’s shocked horror, he acknowledges the end of all things: « I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time like tears in rain. Time to die ».

Thus, at the end of their journey, Kurtz and Batty appear to be polar opposites. Batty is frantically looking for longer life, whereas an existential disgust colors each and every one of Kurtz’s words: « I watched a small snail, crawling on the edge of a straight razor. That's my dream.  It's my nightmare. Crawling, slithering, along the edge of a straight razor, and surviving ». Death to Kurtz is deliverance from a never ending nightmare (« After such knowledge, what forgiveness », T.S. Eliot). Kurtz is the true Hero of this Odyssey. His survival in the presence of the « horror » shows where his superiority truly lies. His relentlessness to live despite a debilitating clarity of mind is of a mythical order. He is Prometheus, punished for his human condition, enlightened in a world of blind men. Kurtz, more so than the incontrollable Batty, perceives the vacuity of being: « We are the hollow men… We are the stuffed men… Leaning together… Headpiece filled with straw. Alas! Our dried voices, when we whisper together are quiet and meaningless… As wind in dry grass or rats’ feet over broken glass in our dry cellar ». In the end however both men share the same intimate experience of the impermanence of things. To Batty, this is an epiphany, borne of his confrontation with Tyrell: « Revel in your time ». In true nietszcheean fashion, Batty puts his Creator to death, thus getting full responsibility for his existence. In his final moments, the former slave acknowledges the rise and decline of all things..  

Friday, July 15, 2011

Une Leçon de Mort : Apocalypse Now et Blade Runner

(English translation coming up)
Télécharger version pdf



Une Leçon de Mort : « Apocalypse Now » et « Blade Runner »

Dans « Apocalypse Now », reprenant la trame du roman « Heart of Darkness » de Conrad, Willard remonte le fleuve en quête de Kurtz, brillant colonel de l’armée américaine devenu le leader omnipotent d’une armée d’indigènes, conduisant selon ses propres règles des opérations de guerre d’une rare sauvagerie. Dans « Blade Runner », Deckard poursuit quatre replicants en fuite, humanoïdes créés par ingénierie génétique à l’image de l’Homme, et pour cette même raison, frappés d’interdiction sur Terre. Les deux films content l’histoire d'un anti-héros solitaire, alcoolique, hanté par un passé dont le spectateur ne connaîtra presque rien, chargé par l’autorité hiérarchique de traquer un renégat charismatique et mystérieux, oeuvrant à l’écart de l’univers des hommes, régnant en demi-dieu sur une poignée d’âmes. Willard sera opposé au colonel Walter Kurtz, Deckard, au replicant Roy Batty.  


En marge de l’existence : Willard et Deckard

Le film de Coppola débute avec Willard, que l’on découvre dans une chambre d’hôtel de Saïgon, livré à ses démons, prostré sur un lit en désordre, le regard perdu au plafond, des visions de napalm dansant devant ses yeux, longues traînées de flammes sur une jungle obscure. Willard est un solitaire. Lorsqu’une mission lui est enfin attribuée, il se lamente de devoir partager la route : « I needed the air and the time.  Only problem was, I wouldn't be alone ». Deckard aussi, dans la vie et dans le travail. Refusant de prime abord sa mission, prétextant être à la retraite, il est vite rappelé à la réalité : « If you're not cop, you're little people ». Par suite, le blade runner apparaît déconnecté de son rôle social, débitant d’un air indifférent des sentences moralement neutres telles que : « Replicants are like any other machine. They're either a benefit or a hazard. If they're a benefit, it's not my problem ». Willard et Deckard semblent déconnectés de la société, puis à mesure que le film progresse, déconnectés du genre humain. De même que Willard face à ses supérieurs, Deckard agit en automate. N’existant que par sa fonction, il se borne à respecter formellement les règles du jeu, sans implication personnelle. A la replicante Rachel, il fait passer le test Voight Kampff, supposé départager l’humain de son imitation. Son débit de parole est monocorde, dénué de toute émotion positive ou négative. De la même façon, Willard s’avoue inapte à reprendre une vie civile normale, mais ne paraît pas davantage à sa place au milieu des autres soldats. Il n’appartient plus au monde des vivants, mais au Cœur des Ténèbres, le royaume de Kurtz, qui est le royaume de la mort.

La rupture entre Willard et le monde n’est pas seulement sociale, elle est existentielle. Certes, prisonnier de sa chambre d’hôtel, Willard attribue son désarroi à l’inactivité forcée d’un soldat sans mission. Dans un accès de rage auto-destructrice, il frappe son reflet dans le miroir, puis contemple avec une sorte de stupeur le sang s’écoulant de sa main. Il est difficile alors de ne pas songer alors à la description de Kurtz que fera plus tard le même Willard : « He broke from them, and then he broke from himself », première indication que héros et vilain sont interchangeables. Pourtant, la douleur de Willard ne ressort pas de l’ennui, de la démobilisation, mais d’une souffrance existentielle, son geste est une expression de désespoir aussi pure et primitive que le hurlement de loup de Batty à la mort de Pris. De même que Deckard, il n’existe qu’au travers de sa mission, laquelle, comme la vaine éradication de replicants « plus humains que l’humain », est une chimère : « You understand, Captain, that this mission does not exist, nor will it ever exist ». A plusieurs reprises, Willard en considère avec effarement l’inanité : au milieu d’un surréaliste carnage militaire, au prix de milles périls, remonter la rivière pour tuer un soldat accusé de meurtre. Son interrogation fait écho aux paroles de Kurtz au début du film, bribes de monologues sur une bande audio crachotante : « They call me an assassin.  What do you call it, when the assassins accuse the assassin? » Si Willard et Deckard ont une fonction sociale, à la différence de Kurtz et Batty, cette fonction même est une illusion, dissimulant un néant existentiel. Privé d’une mission, confronté à son reflet, Willard se reconnaît pour ce qu’il est : un homme creux, vacuité d’existence, le « hollow man » du poème de T.S. Eliot récité par Kurtz à la fin du film.

Le rôle de Willard et Deckard est d’ailleurs remis en question par les autres personnages, parachevant l’aliénation de protagonistes subsistant socialement par l’entremise d’une chimère. Rachel demande à Deckard s’il a déjà « retiré » un humain par erreur, si lui-même a passé le test Voight Kampff, s’il la traquerait… Pour Kurtz, Willard n’est ni tueur ni soldat : « You're an errand boy, sent by grocery clerks, to collect a bill ». Incidemment, la référence faite par Kurtz aux supérieurs de Willard, assimilés à de vulgaires commerçants, renvoie au mercantilisme du créateur de Batty : « Commerce, is our goal here at Tyrell ». Ici toutefois, Kurtz se dépense en vain en sarcasme. Willard, à ce stade, n’est plus un soldat, pas davantage une marionnette de ses supérieurs. Il est une abstraction d’homme, un personnage à la Beckett, un individu tombé en dehors de la sphère des hommes, tout comme Deckard réalisant à la fin, en découvrant l’origami de licorne, que le dernier lien qui le reliait à l’Humanité est rompu. Willard et Deckard sont apatrides du genre humain.

Willard et Deckard sont deux marginaux : en marge de la société, mais surtout en marge de l’existence, aux prises avec un univers incompréhensible. Willard promène tout au long du film un regard incrédule sur les autres personnages, soldat observant ses compagnons d’arme avec l’air d’un ethnologue confronté à une peuplade inconnue aux mœurs indéchiffrables. Il fait partie de leur monde mais ne peut comprendre leurs motivations. Lui-même, qui ne saisit pas clairement les motifs de ses actes, est incapable de s’identifier aux autres. Si Willard est plongé dans un perpétuel étonnement, Deckard paraît avoir dépassé ce stade, avoir renoncé à comprendre ce qui motive les individus absolument adaptés à leur milieu, tels que Bryant ou Gaff. Le blade runner affiche une passivité désabusée dépassant de loin la distance ironique du protagoniste classique de film noir. Ni Willard ni Deckard ne peuvent communiquer utilement avec leurs contemporains, confrontés comme à un mur au chaos du monde, et à ce qui tient lieu d’ordre au sein du chaos. Pour le soldat, la guerre (dont le caractère apocalyptique est évident dès la descente de l’hélicoptère au milieu d’une bataille féroce) et l’absurdité d’une structure hiérarchique rigide au plus profond de l’Enfer. Pour le blade runner, l’enchevêtrement urbain d’un Los Angeles en forme de Babel futuriste, superposition infinie de constructions opaques et de cultures étrangères, et au centre de ce désordre digne de Bosch, un système de castes fondé sur l’opposition arbitraire entre humains et replicants. 


En marge de l’existence : Batty et Kurtz

L’ordre social, incarné par les supérieurs hiérarchiques de Deckard et Willard, a rendu un même jugement contre Batty et Kurtz : deux êtres déviants et asociaux, deux parodies d’Humanité qu’il convient d’éradiquer (pour les replicants, « This was not called execution. It was called retirement » ; pour Kurtz, « Terminate with extreme prejudice »). Kurtz et Batty, divinités auto-proclamées, s’expriment par énigmes et affichent à l’égard de la masse une supériorité au-delà de l’arrogance, une conscience suraiguë de leur singularité. Dans le même temps, cette supériorité est la raison même de leur perte. Le leader replicant est une figure nietszchéenne, au-delà de l’Humain, condamnée à brûler intensément et s’éteindre brusquement au terme de quatre années. Batty doit mourir parce qu’il est une simple imitation, un « skin job », une apparence superficielle d’humanité, programmée pour singer à la perfection son créateur. En tant qu’esclave, sa liberté même est le mal dont Deckard doit purger la société. Batty est jugé intrinsèquement étranger au genre humain. Kurtz, lui, doit mourir parce que ses actions l’ont banni du genre humain, qu’il s’est entièrement livré au côté obscur de l’âme, à une folie meurtrière associée par le général occidental à l’esprit primitif de la jungle : « Every man has got a breaking point. You have and I have one. Walter Kurtz has reached his. And, very obviously, he has gone insane. He's out there operating without any decent restraint, totally beyond the pale of any acceptable human conduct ». Le général a raison : chaque homme a son point de rupture. Pour le général, garant de l’ordre et de la raison sociale, au-delà du point de rupture s’étend le royaume de la folie.

Par suite, Batty et Kurtz font effectivement preuve, en surface, d’une sorte de démence. Batty est sujet à de violents retournements émotionnels, bave, hurle comme un loup et poursuit Deckard avec une intensité maniaque. Kurtz dans son royaume au cœur des ténèbres parait détaché de toute rationalité, détaché de sa propre personne… « And what would his people back home want, if they ever learned just how far from them he'd really gone. He broke from them, and then he broke from himself ». Il erre dans un labyrinthe de maçonnerie antique en récitant T.S. Eliot et proférant des monologues décousus. Ses seuls compagnons occidentaux sont un ancien Marine au regard vide et un journaliste hippie au cerveau calciné par les excès du Summer of Love. Cependant, la folie apparente de Batty et Kurtz n’est que le résultat d’une quête existentielle menée avec une détermination tout à fait étrangère au commun des mortels. Bryant et le général, qui jettent Deckard et Willard à leur poursuite, ne peuvent soutenir la pureté glaciale de cette quête de vérité (« Because there's nothing I detest more than the stench of lies », Kurtz). Batty suit sa propre logique et les étrangetés de son attitude sont le fruit des conditions de sa création, un guerrier doté de souvenirs factices, condamné par les termes même de sa mise au monde à maîtriser en une poignée d’années les expériences et les émotions d’une vie entière. Kurtz expose longuement à Willard où se situe son point de rupture. Il raconte comment le Vietcong, après la vaccination par les soldats américains de tous les enfants d’un village, a ordonné que chaque enfant soit amputé, et exprime une admiration matinée de répulsion devant cette extraordinaire démonstration de volonté. A ce moment, Kurtz a compris la supériorité de son ennemi, sa détermination à vaincre, au-delà de toutes considérations morales. Alors seulement est-il devenu ce produit final de la logique de guerre que rencontre Willard au fin fond de la jungle, un être sur-adapté à son environnement, un soldat s’étant totalement identifié à son ennemi pour le surpasser. Cette transformation est sans retour (« To make an alteration in the evolvment of an organic life system is fatal », Tyrell). Kurtz, comme Batty, incarne dans sa chair l’absurdité de la société des hommes. Un tel individu ne doit pas prospérer. 


Jeu de miroirs : Deckard contre Batty, Willard contre Kurtz

Willard et Deckard sont moralement ambigus, qualité partagée par leurs antagonistes respectifs. Après avoir froidement achevé une vietnamienne injustement massacrée par les Marines, Willard remarque en voix off que désormais ses compagnons le regarderaient d’un autre œil. Le spectateur aussi. C’est le premier acte de violence de Willard, jusqu’ici témoin passif du conflit. De façon remarquable, cet acte vise un civil. Comme Kurtz, Willard n’est pas seulement enclin à la violence, il est tout entier possédé par l’esprit de la guerre, ne vit qu’au travers d’un combat dont il mesure par ailleurs la vacuité. La guerre, pour Willard, est une drogue. La scène d’ouverture est une scène de manque. Seulement sous cet angle peut-on comprendre l’attirance/répulsion de Willard pour le combat. En cela encore, Willard et Kurtz ne font qu’un. Le colonel, force de la nature envahie par l’esprit de la guerre, puis de la jungle, doit mourir, car seule la mort peut le libérer de la dépendance. La guerre comme drogue est une image omniprésente : voir l’atmosphère psychédélique de la dernière partie du film, la danse hallucinée de Lance tandis que le bateau s’enfonce dans la jungle, la lancinante mélodie orientale des Doors... Deckard est tout aussi ambigu, qui pourchasse et abat des créatures pensantes dont on ne comprend guère ce qui les distinguent des Humains (ainsi Tyrell récite-t-il d’un ton presque moqueur les attributs du test  Voight Kampff – « Capillary dilation of the so-called blush response? Fluctuation of the pupil? Involuntary dilation of the iris » – la fluctuation de la pupille étant censée départager l’homme de la machine). Sa relation avec Rachel est empreinte de violence et de domination. Quelle différence entre les exécutions de Deckard et celles de Batty ? Deckard abat Zhora dans le dos, celle-ci étant désarmée et en fuite. Le replicant avoue à son créateur, Tyrell : « I've done questionable things ».  Il affiche en prononçant ces mots une mélancolie teintée de remords. L’attitude de Batty envers la violence est tout aussi ambivalente que celle de Kurtz. Les deux hommes sont intrinsèquement des guerriers – Batty, par dessein de son Créateur, Kurtz, par vocation – mais ressentent avec une acuité douloureuse la proximité de la mort. En est témoin pour Batty la manière dont il rapporte la mort de Léon, puis qu’il découvre celle de Pris, et enfin, les larmes versées en assassinant Tyrell. En est témoin la brisure intérieure de Kurtz, reflétant celle de Willard, les deux soldats apparaissant condamnés à vivre et revivre « l’horreur ».

L’opposition apparente de Deckard et Batty reflète celle de Willard et Kurtz. Batty, en guise de leçon sur la condition humaine, fait de Deckard son double, un esclave en fuite : « Quite an experience to live in fear, isn't it? That's what it is to be a slave ». Les replicants, comme les soldats, apprennent à vivre dans la peur. Kurtz implore Willard de mettre fin à son existence et de raconter au monde ce qu’il a tenté d’accomplir. Superficiellement, Willard est l’outil de l’ordre social. En réalité, sur un plan métaphysique, Kurtz a attiré Willard, son doppelgänger, comme un aimant, comme le reflux d’une vague infiniment lourde, en a fait, de sa propre volonté, l’instrument de sa délivrance. Par suite, Willard se voit comme la main du destin : « Everybody wanted me to do it.  Him most of all.  I felt like he was up there, waiting for me to take his pain away. Even the jungle wanted him dead.  And that's who he really who he took his orders from, anyway ». Lorsqu’il sort de la tanière du colonel, la machette ensanglantée, sous le regard de centaines d’indigènes, il est effectivement devenu Kurtz. Batty et Kurtz ont mis en scène leur mort, devant un témoin de leur choix : du moment même où le « héros » rencontre son adversaire, il tombe entier sous son contrôle. Batty peut à chaque instant tuer Deckard. Kurtz, de façon frappante, s’inquiète de la façon dont son histoire sera racontée en Amérique. Pas un moment envisage-t-il de tuer Willard et de rentrer au pays. Kurtz a brûlé tous ses ponts. Au-delà du point de rupture, au bout de la rivière, il n’y a pas de retour possible. Kurtz a façonné sa légende noire, dont il espère que Willard, son alter-ego, rapportera la leçon au monde civilisé. Willard reprend le bateau, Deckard s’enfuit avec Rachel, mais il est douteux que l’un ou l’autre ait réellement quitté le monde intérieur de Kurtz et Batty. Willard et Deckard ne sont pas perçus par Kurtz et Batty comme des ennemis, mais les témoins de leur grandeur et déclin, à qui une leçon existentielle est délivrée. Dès lors, le chemin de Deckard le conduit inéluctablement à Batty, de même que la rivière conduit Willard à Kurtz : « Weeks away and hundreds of miles up river that snaked through the war like a circuit cable...plugged straight into Kurtz ».


L’Art de la Mort

Les mondes de « Blade Runner » et « Apocalypse Now » tombent sous la juridiction de la Mort. Le second, de la façon la plus évidente : la guerre du Vietnam est le dernier avatar d’une certaine conception de la guerre comme entreprise d’éradication massive de l’ennemi (« We must incinerate them.  Pig after pig.  Cow after cow.  Village after village.  Army after army », Kurtz). Une autre vision de la mort, plus subtile, est à l’œuvre dans « Blade Runner » : Los Angeles décadent, peuplé de choses artificielles, animaux factices (la chouette, le serpent) et androïdes indiscernables des citoyens déshumanisés du futur. JF Sebastian, atteint d’une maladie dégénérescente, vit entouré d’amis fabriqués de sa main : « My friends are toys. I make them ». En ce sens, les deux films apparaissent comme des allégories gnostiques : les protagonistes sont pris au piège d’un monde inférieur sous l’empire de la Mort. Batty est un ange déchu, comme il le souligne lui-même implicitement : « Fiery the angels fell. Deep thunder rode around their shores, burning with the fires of Orc ». Le dialogue entre Pris et Sebastian est explicitement gnostique : « Pris: What's your problem? Sebastian: Methuselah syndrome. Pris: What's that? Sebastian: My glands. They grow old too fast. Pris: Is that why you're still on earth? ». Sebastian, comme les replicants, comme Deckard, est condamné à vivre ses jours sur Terre, le monde inférieur soumis au règne de l’entropie et de la décomposition. La vie est ailleurs, au firmament : « A new life awaits you in the Off-world colonies. The chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure ». Willard et Deckard sont prisonniers de ce simulacre de réalité : « When I was here, I wanted to be there.  When I was there... all I could think of was getting back into the jungle ». De même, les premières paroles de Kurtz évoquent avec nostalgie le paradis perdu : « I went down that river once when I was a kid. There's a place in the river, I can't remember...must have been a gardenia plantation, or a flower plantation at one time. It's all wild and overgrown now. But for about five miles, you'd think that heaven just fell on the earth, in the form of gardenias ». Willard remonte la rivière pour atteindre Kurtz, remonte le temps vers une forme d’horreur primordiale dont Kurtz est devenu le centre. Le souvenir de Kurtz descend la rivière, depuis l’abomination du présent jusqu’au fantasme d’une enfance dorée.

Le colonel et le replicant délivrent leur propre eulogie. Ici se séparent les deux hommes. Kurtz est un être brisé, déchiré : « I'd never seen a man so broken up and ripped apart ». Lui qui a sondé les profondeurs de la réalité n’aspire plus qu’à la mort : « The horror… the horror »… reflet de la guerre, bien sûr, mais la réplique provient directement du roman « Heart of Darkness », et renvoie plus certainement à la terreur primordiale de Kurtz face aux démons auxquels il s’est livré au cœur de la jungle. Toute spéculation est superflue. Ce que Kurtz a vu reste une énigme, tout comme Batty (« if only you could see what I've seen with your eyes »). Ce qui importe est que Kurtz ait plongé le regard au Cœur des Ténèbres. « Horror has a face.  And you must make a friend of horror. Horror and moral terror are your friends.  If they are not, then they are enemies to be feared ». Kurtz est un homme en ruines, tenaillé par l’obsession de l’acte, comme Macbeth après le crime. Batty, l’ange déchu revenu sur Terre aux fins de capturer un surcroît d’humanité, conçoit la brièveté de son existence comme une malfaçon. Les replicants vivent quatre années. Ni plus ni moins. Il rencontre son dieu, le génial Tyrell. Celui-ci est clairement une divinité créatrice (« He knows everything », dit le généticien chinois), identifiée comme telle par Batty : « It's not an easy thing to meet your maker ». Tyrell interroge Batty sur son problème. La mort est le problème. Ici, le Créateur reconnaît ses limites : « Well, I'm afraid that's a little out of my jurisdiction ». Tyrell explique que Batty a été conçu aussi bien que possible. Le terme de la vie n’est pas négociable (« You don’t ask Death for its credentials »,  W.S. Burroughs). Gaff, rappelant à Deckard que Rachel doit également être exécutée : « It's too bad she won't live. But then again, who does? » Batty, en acquérant un supplément de vie, ne deviendra pas davantage humain. La conscience du caractère fini de l’existence est en soi ce qui le définit comme humain. « The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long. And you have burned so very very brightly, Roy ». Sa chance est d’avoir un Créateur à qui adresser en personne ses doléances. Une chance, car le tout-puissant Tyrell, confiné dans sa tour dorée au plus haut de la cité, est une réalité tangible. Seul parmi la masse des êtres pensants, Batty reçoit de son Dieu une réponse. Sa mortalité enfin acceptée, aux antipodes du saisissement d’horreur de Kurtz, c’est avec mélancolie qu’il prend acte de la fin de toutes choses : « I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time like tears in rain. Time to die ».

En ce sens, Kurtz et Batty apparaissent comme deux pôles. Batty est obsédé par l’idée de prolonger sa vie, tandis qu’une sorte de dégoût existentiel imprègne chaque parole de Kurtz : « I watched a small snail, crawling on the edge of a straight razor. That's my dream.  It's my nightmare. Crawling, slithering, along the edge of a straight razor, and surviving». La mort est pour Kurtz la délivrance d’un interminable cauchemar (« After such knowledge, what forgiveness », T.S. Eliot). Kurtz est le Héros de cette Odyssée. Sa survivance en présence de « l’horreur » en fait un être d’exception. Son acharnement à vivre en dépit d’une lucidité débilitante est d’ordre mythique, l’expression d’une force primordiale. Il est Prométhée, puni pour sa condition humaine, qui a atteint l’illumination dans un monde aveugle, la supériorité au sein des médiocres. Kurtz, bien davantage que l’incontrôlable Batty, perçoit la vacuité de l’être : « We are the hollow men… We are the stuffed men… Leaning together… Headpiece filled with straw. Alas! Our dried voices, when we whisper together are quiet and meaningless… As wind in dry grass or rats’ feet over broken glass in our dry cellar ». Toutefois, les deux personnages se rejoignent dans leur compréhension ultime, intimement vécue, de l’impermanence des choses. C’est pour Batty une véritable épiphanie, coïncidant avec la confrontation de Tyrell : « Revel in your time ». En héros nietszchéen, Batty met à mort son créateur, et ce faisant, acquiert la pleine responsabilité de son existence et la conscience du déclin de toutes choses.  

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Single du Jour : The Crack-Up

UPDATE : Track removed until the final commercial release.


Roland JX3P and Microkorg vocoder.

 
"The Crack-Up



All life is a process of breaking down

Sleep and eat and getting old

Everything under control

The crack’s in me.



Time drips down from your bones – falling down

Dodge and weave and getting bored

Everything under control

The crack’s in me.



The cure does not work

Little boy lost in the woods

With anything he wants to do

Finding nothing, nothing he wants to do



The cure does not work
Little girl lost in the woods"